Upcoming Worship Services

BFUU Fellowship Hall 1924 Cedar Street
(at the corner of Cedar St. and Bonita Ave.)
all services are on Sundays from 10:30 AM to around noon, unless otherwise noted

TLoop no text30wheelchair30x30The Fellowship Hall (1924 Cedar St) is accessible by a ramp on the Bonita Avenue side of the Hall, and has a T-Loop system to enhance audio for those with hearing aids.

We will be meeting on Zoom for Worship Services on Sundays at 10:30 AM. If you’d like to attend, please email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. for the meeting ID and link.

If you have the ID, go to https://zoom.us/join and enter the Meeting ID. One tap mobile: +16699006833,,<meetingID># US (San Jose) Dial by your location: +1 669 900 6833 US (San Jose) - to do this, dial: 1 669 900 6833, then dial the meeting number, then dial the # sign twice.) If you need help getting onto zoom, please include that in your email to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. or leave a voicemail at 510-841-4824 ext. 1.

800px PFLAG of the Lower Shenandoah 07 DC Capital Pride 2014 06 07TimEvansonJuly 12: There’s Something Wrong With the Village; reflections on being the parent of a trans-gender teen 
Rev. Ben Meyers (he/him), Guest Worship Leader
There’s a famous African proverb often quoted by white liberals: “It takes a village to raise a child.” And yet...if we’re unable to raise ALL of our children, including our trans-, gender non-binary children, then there must be something wrong with the village. The sermon looks at what that might be, based on direct experience.
Photo: Tim Evanson via Flickr
The Rev. Ben Meyers is celebrating his 25th year in the UU ministry and was a part-time minister at BFUU from 2009 to 2013. He is currently serving his eighth year of service at the UU congregation in San Mateo, serves in his local NAACP branch and is on the steering committee of the San Mateo County Showing Up for Racial Justice (SURJ) chapter.
 
options 396266 crop3July 19: The Great Transition Part One
Rev. Marsh Agobert (he/him), Worship Leader

We, at BFUU, have an open conversation regarding the current “great revealing.”* There are areas of interest for most everyone. How the two most recent entries (the surge in Black Lives Matter and the viral pandemic) will come to impact our movement forward in time has yet to be determined. Yet we have been graced with a momentary pause to consider such questions. Where do we want to come out on the other side of this moment, and how can we make the most of it? What role can our small community play in this event? Part one: Identifying the (potential) changes on the table. 
*Apocalypse:  Greek apokálypsis revelation, equivalent to apokalýp(tein) to uncover, reveal.
Marsh Agobert is an ordained Unitarian-Universalist cleric who began his ministry with the First Unitarian Church of Oakland in the late 70s and early 80s. He has long practiced psychotherapeutic treatment and has successfully worked with individuals, couples, families, and actively psychotic inpatients. Marsh is an experienced management consultant (he prefers small and mid-sized businesses) and a life coach, which well utilizes his broad background. Marsh has extensive experience in several spiritual practices, including martial arts and yogas such as Mindfulness, Anusara, and Tai-Chi/Qi Gong, being among the most recent during the past ten years.
 
LostSudokuVirginitybyAnnieMoleJuly 26:  The Puzzle of Sudoku: If It’s Mind, Does It Matter? 
Rev. Dr. Carrie Knowles (she/her), Worship Leader
In this time of stress and isolation, when the future remains uncertain in so many spheres of our lives, we do well to seek refuge in solo activities that can give us pleasure and a sense of accomplishment. Rev. Dr. Carrie considers the evidence that mastering puzzles like Sudoku has promise not only of escape from stress but also of strengthening our cognitive skills that support us beyond the challenges of today.
Rev. Dr. Carrie Knowles describes herself as a recovering psychologist and recovering attorney, who graduated from Starr King in 2011 and was ordained to UU ministry in 2013. Along with providing pastoral care at BFUU and preaching at Bay Area churches as a guest speaker, she writes poetry, short stories, and is working on a memoir.
 
YSA Logo 2August 2: Youth Leaders Stepping Forward
MameDiarra AbdurRahman (she/her), Reginald Gentry (he/him), and Eli Streiff (he/him or they/them), Guest Speakers
Recent headlines bring news  about young people stepping up to organize large protests about anti-Black police violence. Young voices speaking truth to power! Meanwhile, although not as visible to the world at large, Youth Spirit Artworks  is  empowering its own group of youth leaders. Several of its talented artists will report on their work to serve unhoused and housing-insecure young people. Building tiny homes together, their vision is to create Tiny Home villages where young people can thrive through mutual support.
Reginald Gentry: I am the Social Media Communications Leader at YSA. I grew up in Oakland, Berkeley, and Richmond. I currently live in Berkeley. I’m working towards earning an Associates Degree in Animation and Game Design from Berkeley City College, gaining more social media management and coordination experience and establishing a more notorious video game career as a streamer and competitive gamer. Since I’ve been at YSA in August of 2015, I’ve worked as an Aspirant Artist, Social Media Leader, Board Member, and Assistant Project Manager. There are multiple skills and knowledge I’ve learned here such as getting more comfortable with public speaking, how to be a social media coordinator, getting familiar with different genders and sexualities, as well as seeing the positive influence that YSA has upon the Berkeley and the Bay Area community. I’ve never been an artist necessarily, but art has helped my life by showing me to appreciate the creativity and originality of people’s artwork, to have a more in-depth conversation with people, and has presented me with opportunities to make money.
Eli Streiff: I am a Community Art Leader at YSA. I am a Bay Area raised Illustrator, painter and muralist. Mixing regional flora and forms with invented mythologies, my art is inspired by the wilderness and hidden or forgotten places. I came to YSA to participate and engage with my wider community, and develop new skills to further his practice. I am currently working on expanding our capacity for screen-printing production and am the lead youth on our Tiny House Village Murals Project.
 
inclusion 2728130 1280August 9: The Color-Blind Society and Other Myths: Dismantling Racism in America
Clovice Lewis (he/him), Guest Worship Leader
Through his many careers as music composer and performer, entrepreneur/software designer, and professor of computer music, the unifying life theme for Clovice Lewis has been his personal mission to break down racial, gender, class and ethnic barriers. Through his spoken and musical messages, Clovice urgently reminds the world of the madness of human self-extinction.
Clovice is a professional cellist and composer who composed his first symphony at the age of 17, and was a professor of computer music at UC Santa Barbara from 1978-1986. He has also been a serial entrepreneur and software designer for the past 30 years. In addition to music and technology, he has had had a life-long passion for aviation, and has been a private pilot since 1987. Clovice is presently completing a Master of Divinity degree at the Starr Kind School for the Ministry. He describes his personal mission as breaking down racial, gender, class, and ethnic barriers and in preaching the gospel of the madness of human self-extinction.
 
Prismatic Chaos Arrow 200August 16: The Great Transition Part Two 
Rev. Marsh Agobert (he/him), Worship Leader
We, at BFUU, have an open conversation regarding the current “great revealing.”* There are areas of interest for most everyone. How the two most recent entries (the surge in Black Lives Matter and the viral pandemic) will come to impact our movement forward in time has yet to be determined. Yet we have been graced with a momentary pause to consider such questions. Where do we want to come out on the other side of this moment, and how can we make the most of it? What role can our small community play in this event? Part two: Given we don’t need to know how to do something before setting out to create or do it, what can we do to get where we want to be?
*Apocalypse:  Greek apokálypsis revelation, equivalent to apokalýp(tein) to uncover, reveal.
Marsh Agobert is an ordained Unitarian-Universalist cleric who began his ministry with the First Unitarian Church of Oakland in the late 70s and early 80s. He has long practiced psychotherapeutic treatment and has successfully worked with individuals, couples, families, and actively psychotic inpatients. Marsh is an experienced management consultant (he prefers small and mid-sized businesses) and a life coach, which well utilizes his broad background. Marsh has extensive experience in several spiritual practices, including martial arts and yogas such as Mindfulness, Anusara, and Tai-Chi/Qi Gong, being among the most recent during the past ten years.
 
Annie Kenney and Christabel PankhurstVotesforWomenpublicdomainAugust 23: From Sojourner Truth to Stacy Abrams: Women’s Equality Day and the Right To Vote 
Rev. Dr. Carrie Knowles (she/her), Worship Leader
On this 100th Anniversary of the passage of the 19th Amendment that gave women the right to vote, Rev. Dr. Carrie Knowles traces the history of voting rights for African American women and other women of color, and the fight for equality in all walks of life.
Rev. Dr. Carrie Knowles describes herself as a recovering psychologist and recovering attorney, who graduated from Starr King in 2011 and was ordained to UU ministry in 2013. Along with providing pastoral care at BFUU and preaching at Bay Area churches as a guest speaker, she writes poetry, short stories, and is working on a memoir.
 
earthclimatechangeNASA2whitebgcropAugust 30: Rising to the Climate Emergency: What Can We Count On? 
Joanna Macy (she/her), Guest Speaker
Joanna Macy encourages us to identify our strengths and tools for change as we face the challenge of the global climate crisis. Young activists will also join us to report how they are building a mass movement of young people to stop climate change and create millions of good-paying jobs in the process.
Joanna Macy, Ph.D., is an environmental activist, author, scholar of Buddhism, general systems theory and deep ecology. A respected voice in movements for peace, justice and ecology, she interweaves her scholarship with learnings from six decades of activism.